Belgian Twins Win Right to Die

This isn’t exactly a childfree topic, but I think it’s worthy of addressing here because it reiterates why antinatalism is the way, the truth, and the light.

A pair of Belgian twins born deaf recently started going blind. As they started to go blind, they requested euthanasia (euthanasia is legal in Belgium). After a legal battle, the courts ruled that they were suffering unbearably and granted their right to die, and they died via lethal injection, together. Here’s a link to the story: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2262630/Brother-deaf-Belgian-twins-killed-euthanasia-describes-final-words-reveals-live-learning-going-blind.html

First of all, on top of being an antinatalist, I’m a firm supporter of one’s right to die. I believe the right for (born) people to live also includes their right to die without any interference from the state. I support these brothers’ decision and would have definitely made the same decision myself if I were in their shoes. That said, I think euthanasia/assisted suicide should be legal whenever and for whatever reason a patient deems fit, and that includes just being tired of life. Voluntary euthanasia should be a protected right, for any reason. Period, end of story. There’s just no way to effectively argue against that.

That said, I said this story reinforces why I’m an antinatalist and I’ll tell you right now why. Had these brothers never been born, they’d have never had to suffer these devastating effects. They’d have been spared a lifetime of pain and suffering had they never been brought into existence. Their lives were not only not worth starting (nobody’s life is worth starting, though), they apparently also were not worth continuing. When there’s a risk of life that’s not worth continuing, why bring someone into existence whose life might possibly not be worth continuing? Once again, we see why procreation is immoral.

I’m just glad there are some forward-thinking countries in this world, and I hope the right to die will soon be advanced everywhere. Good job, Belgium.

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About coolchildfreeguy

Childfree guy living in Mexico City. Professional pilot by day, all-around fun guy by night.

Posted on January 15, 2013, in Law, Life, Medicine, Philosophy, Religion. Bookmark the permalink. 4 Comments.

  1. I hope to have this privilege when I need it the most.

  2. This is very interesting. Most Americans I would say don’t even know that you can request to die and it be legal in other countries.

  3. The sooner this is a universal privilege the better. There was a really tragic case here recently where a man completely incapable of any movement other than blinking – despite being fully cognitively and intellectually aware (locked-in syndrome) – was not allowed the right to assisted suicide, meaning that anyone who helped him die would be prosecuted for murder: details here: http://www.guardiannews.com/uk/2012/dec/27/tony-nicklinson-wife-look-around

    To me, that’s tantamount to state-sponsored torture.

    Fortunately (for him), he passed away shortly after the ruling, but obviously that wouldn’t be the outcome for everyone in his condition.

    That said, his is an extreme example. I agree that the right to due should be afforded to anyone, so long as they’re rational and long-term in their wish to cease to be.

  4. A little earlier today, I came upon a blog post by a deaf person who is concerned how the news of these two brothers killing themselves so they wouldn’t live blind and deaf would effect young deaf people losing their eyesight to Usher’s syndrome. Basically, the person meant why were these men selfish to kill themselves when they could have been role models to blind and deaf children and adults. If these men had thought if they stayed alive they could be role models, it doesn’t mean they wouldn’t still choose death. They didn’t choose death as a way to blow a big raspberry at the blind and deaf community for wanting its members to give hope to other members.

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